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The Times, 10 November 1796

John Marshal, who at the last Perth Circuit Court, was found guilty of poisoning his wife, was executed at Perth on Friday fe'nnight. On the Wednesday before his execution, he attempted to hang himself in prison, but was cut down before he effected his purpose. To the Clergyman who visited him, while under sentence of death, he stated that he was prompted to poison his wife, by having set his affections on a girl, named Ann Cree, with whom he had carried on a criminal correspondence, and who had borne a child to him, which they privily put to death. He made several attempts to poison his wife before the one that succeeded.

Potential Connection Between Alexander Crie of the East India Company and William Cree of Sprotborough.
Today I have found two reference sources which clearly relate to Alexander Crie (No. 1390), East India Company, son of James Crie (No. 1364), surgeon and Provost of Perth. The first letter was written on 29 September 1767 after his second voyage to India since his ship the 'Brittania' arrived back in the Downs on 20 July 1767. He clearly felt that even with his relatively short experience that he deserved the command of an EIC ship. Clearly this did not happen and on the 24 April 1769 the Archbishop of York, Robert Hay Drummond, wrote again on his behalf to Clive of India, perhaps for a different assignment. Robert Hay Drummond was the youngest son of George Henry Hay, 8th Earl of Kinnoull, who had bought the Brodsworth estate in 1713.
It seems to be more than a coincidence that William Cree (No 3367) married Martha Nicholson in Sprotborough on 2 July 1744 when Robert Hay Drummond was living about four miles away at Brodsworth Hall. Robert Hay Drummond would have been 33 years old, a very similar age to William Cree of Sprotborough. I therefore believe that they were friends in Perth or at least their families knew each other quite well. This could be the reason why William Cree moved from Perthshire to such a distant location as Sprotborough in Yorkshire and perhaps he helped Robert Hay Drummond on the landscaping at Brodsworth Hall before acquiring the position of gardener at Sprotborough Hall with Godfrey Copley Esquire and meeting his wife.
The Sprotborough Cree line have always claimed a connection to Castle Stewart on the River Cree, close to the town of Newton Stewart, in Scotland. Castle Stewart was bought by Robert Stewart (No 7668) who was the son of William Stewart (No 1369), Provost of Perth, who married Christian Crie (No 1368), daughter of Patrick Crie (No 1356), Provost of Perth, and his wife Elspeth Young (No 1365).
Although complicated, we can therefore see that Alexander Crie (No 1390) of the East India Company was the son of James Crie (No 1364) who in turn was the younger brother of Patrick Crie (No 1356), who was the father of Christian Crie (No 1368) who was the mother of Robert Stewart (No 7668) who bought Castle Stewart. I therefore believe that William Cree of Sprotborough was closely related to Alexander Crie and that explains why the Sprotborough line have always felt a very close connection with Castle Stewart throughout the years. Mike has previously proposed that William Cree of Sprotborough could be one and the same as a William Cree (No 1268) who was baptised in Abernethy, Perthshire, on the 5th September 1712. Clearly there is plenty for discussion here.      
A. Letter from Alexander Crie, probably to Clive.
Mss Eur G37/47/2 f.134 : 29 Sep 1767
Title: Letter from Alexander Crie, probably to Clive.
Collection Area: India Office Records and Private Papers 
Reference: Mss Eur G37/47/2 f.134 
Creation Date: 29 Sep 1767 
Extent and Access: 
Extent: 1 folio 
Contents and Scope: 
Contents: Dated at London, requesting Clive's interest to get him a bottom [i.e. command of a ship]. 

B. Letter to Clive from Robert Hay Drummond, Archbishop of York.
Mss Eur G37/57/1 f.89 : 24 Apr 1769
Title: Letter to Clive from Robert Hay Drummond, Archbishop of York.
Collection Area: India Office Records and Private Papers 
Reference: Mss Eur G37/57/1 f.89 
Creation Date: 24 Apr 1769 
Extent and Access: 
Extent: 1 folio 
Contents and Scope: 
Contents: Dated at Brodsworth, recommending Mr Crie. 
C. Brodsworth Hall
George Henry Hay, 8th Earl of Kinnoull bought the Brodsworth estate from Sir John Wentworth in 1713 and rebuilt the house, but lost his money in the 1720 crash and was obliged to take the position of Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. His younger son Robert took up residence on the estate instead when he was made Archbishop of York in 1761 and made a number of improvements to the house and grounds. On his death in 1777 the house was left empty and when his eldest son became the 10th Earl of Kinnoull in 1787 he sold the estate in 1790 to Peter Thellusson (1737–1797).
D. Robert Hay Drummond
Robert Hay (10 November 1711 – 10 December 1776), known later as Robert Hay-Drummond of Cromlix and Innerpeffray, was Archbishop of York from 1761 to 1776.

Letter 1. Title: "Letter from Alexander Crie, probably to Clive."
Mss Eur G37/47/2  f.134. : 29 Sep 1767


"London 29th Sept 1767

My Lord,

I take the liberty of writing your Lordship, as I find your Lordship has not been able to come to Town on account of your indisposition, which I am heartily sorrow for: To Beg your interest in getting a Bottom, as I am persuaded the Company cannot well refuse your Lordship, who has been of such infinite Service to them.

Hearing your Lordship intervened in favour of Mr McIntosh in Respect to the Bourghis I immediately write in His favour to what friends I have got left there, But I own since my Fathers Death & my long absence from the Country my influence is not so Strong as what it was formerly; But such as it is, if it was greater, is at your Lordships Service,

I am with Great Respect
Your Lordships most
Obedient and humble Servant

Alex Crie

PS If should Be
honoured with an
answer please to direct 
to me, so be left at the
Barr of the Jerusalem
Coffie House"


My Notes on this letter.

(a) The signature of Crie in Alexander Crie is finished off with an underline with two twirls very similar to the four twirls signature of John Cree of Calcutta (http://www.cree.name/archives/brpage.htm?pic=019) within the Spa letter. I have requested a photocopy of the Alexander Crie letter so that I can compare the handwriting. It had crossed my mind that we are still looking for a man with EIC ship experience and who must have served in the EIC about this time, namely 1760s. A comparison of handwriting will provide the answer.  

(b) I am still not clear if a request for a "Bottom" is for the command of a ship or simply for a place as one of the officers. 

(c) The Jerusalem Coffie House was the unofficial headquarters of the East India Company in London.
http://www.aim25.ac.uk/cgi-bin/vcdf/detail?coll_id=16768&inst_i...
"These are the only surviving records of the Jerusalem Coffee House, of Fleece Passage, Cornhill, later known as 32-33 Cowper's Court. The Jerusalem Coffee House was frequented by managing owners of East India Company ships and East India merchants and brokers. "



Letter 2. Title: Letter to Clive from Robert Hay Drummond, Archbishop of York.
Mss Eur G37/57/1  f.89 : 24 Apr 1769

"Brodsworth Apr. 24 1769

My Lord,

I shd (should) be sorry to trouble you with a letter: but I cannot in 'pistie' (peace?) forbear recommending Mr Crie by our patronage who will explain his request to you - His character is known to your Lordship & his connection with Ld (Lord) Kinnoull & all our family is such, that the honor of your Lordship's protection will infinitely oblige us & particularly him, who has the honorable ....the.....regard Myh

Your Lordships
Humble Servant

I beg my Complements to all the parts of yr (your) family whom I have the honor to know.


(To) Rt Honbl L Clive"


Note: I am assuming that this letter again relates to Alexander Crie because of the Crie spelling. However, after writing the 1767 letter it seems odd that he should also try for patronage from Clive again in 1769, presumably after not being successful in 1767.

Trevor Cree said:

Potential Connection Between Alexander Crie of the East India Company and William Cree of Sprotborough.
Today I have found two reference sources which clearly relate to Alexander Crie (No. 1390), East India Company, son of James Crie (No. 1364), surgeon and Provost of Perth. The first letter was written on 29 September 1767 after his second voyage to India since his ship the 'Brittania' arrived back in the Downs on 20 July 1767. He clearly felt that even with his relatively short experience that he deserved the command of an EIC ship. Clearly this did not happen and on the 24 April 1769 the Archbishop of York, Robert Hay Drummond, wrote again on his behalf to Clive of India, perhaps for a different assignment. Robert Hay Drummond was the youngest son of George Henry Hay, 8th Earl of Kinnoull, who had bought the Brodsworth estate in 1713.
It seems to be more than a coincidence that William Cree (No 3367) married Martha Nicholson in Sprotborough on 2 July 1744 when Robert Hay Drummond was living about four miles away at Brodsworth Hall. Robert Hay Drummond would have been 33 years old, a very similar age to William Cree of Sprotborough. I therefore believe that they were friends in Perth or at least their families knew each other quite well. This could be the reason why William Cree moved from Perthshire to such a distant location as Sprotborough in Yorkshire and perhaps he helped Robert Hay Drummond on the landscaping at Brodsworth Hall before acquiring the position of gardener at Sprotborough Hall with Godfrey Copley Esquire and meeting his wife.
The Sprotborough Cree line have always claimed a connection to Castle Stewart on the River Cree, close to the town of Newton Stewart, in Scotland. Castle Stewart was bought by Robert Stewart (No 7668) who was the son of William Stewart (No 1369), Provost of Perth, who married Christian Crie (No 1368), daughter of Patrick Crie (No 1356), Provost of Perth, and his wife Elspeth Young (No 1365).
Although complicated, we can therefore see that Alexander Crie (No 1390) of the East India Company was the son of James Crie (No 1364) who in turn was the younger brother of Patrick Crie (No 1356), who was the father of Christian Crie (No 1368) who was the mother of Robert Stewart (No 7668) who bought Castle Stewart. I therefore believe that William Cree of Sprotborough was closely related to Alexander Crie and that explains why the Sprotborough line have always felt a very close connection with Castle Stewart throughout the years. Mike has previously proposed that William Cree of Sprotborough could be one and the same as a William Cree (No 1268) who was baptised in Abernethy, Perthshire, on the 5th September 1712. Clearly there is plenty for discussion here.      
A. Letter from Alexander Crie, probably to Clive.
Mss Eur G37/47/2 f.134 : 29 Sep 1767
Title: Letter from Alexander Crie, probably to Clive.
Collection Area: India Office Records and Private Papers 
Reference: Mss Eur G37/47/2 f.134 
Creation Date: 29 Sep 1767 
Extent and Access: 
Extent: 1 folio 
Contents and Scope: 
Contents: Dated at London, requesting Clive's interest to get him a bottom [i.e. command of a ship]. 

B. Letter to Clive from Robert Hay Drummond, Archbishop of York.
Mss Eur G37/57/1 f.89 : 24 Apr 1769
Title: Letter to Clive from Robert Hay Drummond, Archbishop of York.
Collection Area: India Office Records and Private Papers 
Reference: Mss Eur G37/57/1 f.89 
Creation Date: 24 Apr 1769 
Extent and Access: 
Extent: 1 folio 
Contents and Scope: 
Contents: Dated at Brodsworth, recommending Mr Crie. 
C. Brodsworth Hall
George Henry Hay, 8th Earl of Kinnoull bought the Brodsworth estate from Sir John Wentworth in 1713 and rebuilt the house, but lost his money in the 1720 crash and was obliged to take the position of Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. His younger son Robert took up residence on the estate instead when he was made Archbishop of York in 1761 and made a number of improvements to the house and grounds. On his death in 1777 the house was left empty and when his eldest son became the 10th Earl of Kinnoull in 1787 he sold the estate in 1790 to Peter Thellusson (1737–1797).
D. Robert Hay Drummond
Robert Hay (10 November 1711 – 10 December 1776), known later as Robert Hay-Drummond of Cromlix and Innerpeffray, was Archbishop of York from 1761 to 1776.
Evening Telegraph, Tayside. 19th April 1911
"OLD TOM CREE"
Abernethy's "Mine Host" is Laid to Rest
A Benefactor to the Poor
Many will learn with regret that Mr Thomas Cree, publican, Abernethy, better known to thousands in central Scotland as "Old Tom Cree," has passed to his rest. In the ancient Pictish Capital "Old Tom" was almost an "institution", and it is safe to say that the great majority of the visitors who made the pilgrimage to the little village on the fringe of Perthshire and Fifeshire for the purpose of viewing the "Round Tower," did not depart without having a crack with Mr Cree.
At the time of his death Mr Cree had the record of being the oldest license-holder in Perthshire, if not in Scotland, and for the long period of 53 years he held the license at Abernethy without a break, and without ever any complaint being lodged against him or his house. When Mr Cree applied for the license, he was quite a young man, but on the bench asking the applicant to stand up in Court his well knit, powerful frame, impressed the bench, and the license was granted then and there. "Old Tom" was a big man physically - he weighed over 22 stone - but he also had a big warm heart and many a poor family in Abernethy will miss the kindly and generous bounty which he was always ready to put to the service of the needy, and many a harassed widow has been able to tide over her difficulties without the indignity of getting poor relief through the kindness of Mr Cree. In the village life of Abernethy "Old Tom" was prominently identifiable and he at one time was elected a Baillie. A staunch Unionist in politics, and a pillar of the "Auld Kirk", the late Mr Cree was a local historian, and in his pawky way, he could narrate many interesting stories concerning the district. A widow survives but no family.

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